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? probably not. look what they have across from the bleach. it says don't mix ammonia and bleach makes a gas. these are bad things to mix with bleach. who's got these under their sink in i do. everybody does. you want to separate the ones that don't go to together. how do you find out? read the labels. these are department of transportation placards, they are colored. they are all red. they have the sort of flame thing up there. the little number here and number here. we've got books in our rig that tell us what these are. based on a number. we will see a 1219, look in the book and say a truck carrying 1219 and it's leaking every where what do we have. george, we have 92 octane gasoline, that's not good. we call people and get help. we as volunteers are not going to be hazardous material people. you need to know this is red, it's flammable. if there is a problem, let us know and keep people away from it. these are more placards. explosives, anything orange, reds yellow. oxidizer, that's going to make a small fire into a really big fire without much help. inhalation hazards, don't breathe i
bottles, even if you leave them in a cold environment, you don't know where they've come from or they've been in ship holds which is really hot, just as a number one rule, if you smell something plastic don't drink out of it. >> that's good advice. >> i have two questions, they're a little bit unrelated but the first one goes on the scheme of plastic, so plastic wrap, plastic bags, you know, it's great to say we should all use glass but we know what's used out there is plastic, and it's reusable, you can come up with all these ways to avoid it but there's plastic everywhere and it's accessible and cheap, so plastic wrap gets used a lot, there aren't that many alternatives that can do what plastic wrap does, i don't use a lot of it and it's harder to store things long-term and same question applies for the freezer, it's easier to put things in a freezer bag. >> so, a little tip for that is i do admit to using plastic bags, i reuse them and if something is not -- i don't use them for liquids and if something isn't somehow already kind of like a solid or whatever, parchment paper around
you think? you don't get in elevator? no. you will be stuck there for awhile. if you go down the stair well. if there's an earthquake and you are in a high rise building. ing -- no. if it hadn't collapsed in the disaster chances are it will stay up. outside, where's an open area? high rise building when glass breaks it floats it with hit 2 blocks away from where it falls. if you are outside, you want to look up and make sure nothing is coming toward you. there is 3-5 feet of glass on market street. top of that you are going to have office furniture and debris falling into the street. even if you are in a car if you are next to large, brick buildings and if collapsed on you there is no safe place to go. how about here. the safety spot is second base. no doubt about it. you have 60,000 people want to go to second base. people get injured jumping chairs. go between the chairs, cover your head and get your head below the seat. there is a lot of crud down there. the chairs will break the fall. if you stop, someone behind you will hit you. so, slow down, pull to the side of the road. stay w
with things that might do better. >> there are 9 states who don't have a personal income tax. you compare the state of vermont with the state of new hampshire. new hampshire has no sales tax or personal income tax and does better over time than the neighboring state of vermont that is a so-called progressive state. on a national level change the constitution or we will end up with a income and a consumption tax. >> unfortunately the constitution was changed in order to bring in the income tax. >> you have to change or we would get the both. >> you are against the idea of bobby gindale. >> i don't like sales tax. we saw the experiment in europe with that. they are onerous often than income tax . they are sneaky, too. it is vast and they are put in every element of sales and you don't know what the true tax rate and the cost. gin dale's program is to replace one source of government to do with another. it doesn't reduce what john and i would like to reduce the flow of money to the government. >> milton freeman didn't like national sales tax because it is too easy for governments to raise mo
in new york city and i hope criminals don't notice that the author of the piece, john cook, is not on the list. and action figures from "jango unchained" is from civil rights leaders and also al sharpton. and why is president obama nominating nothing but white males to the cabinet positions? the war on women continues straight ahead. greg? >> thanks, andy. >> you disgust me, greg. i was going to tell you why. >> why? >> it was only about maybe a month ago you were mocking me mercilessly for wearing a v neck sweater with a collar outside of it. >> really? >> yes. >> this is what happens when you leave your stuff at my place. >> you are just a little filth bucket. >> i am curious, you mentioned john cook. is that the john cook who lives in prospect heights? >> it might be. i'm not sure. jay in brooklyn -- >> in brooklyn? i think so. >> we can get his address. >> i don't know, maybe so. see you later, jerk. let's welcome my first guest. i am here are harris falkner, that's her name. and if hilarity were a gift card i would plow him at the olive garden. he is the co-host of the
third lie." in the book professor gelles argues that the vast majority of government social programs don't work and suggests a different approach. this is about ten minutes. gls well, booktv is on the road. we're in philadelphia at the university of pennsylvania, and we're interviewing some professors who also happen to be authors. and we want to introduce you to the dean of the university of pennsylvania's school of social policy and practice. this is richard gelles on your screen. and one of his books, his most recent, is called "the third lie: why government programs don't work and a blue print for change." dr. gelles, i'm here from the government, and i'm here to help you. is that not true? >> guest: not true. >> host: why not? >> guest: because most government social programs which are designed to help people don't actually help. in some instances it is little more than the, i hate saying this, but the do-gooder full employment act. it provides lots of jobs for people who'd like the help, but at the end of the day if you look at whether the needle has been moved and people have real
therapeutics. >> what are they. >> pills for people who don't take care of themselves. >> it is a volatile and it es up and down faster than evil knevil on a motorcycle. it has a good balance with 10 percent and i like that. >> i like of the reference of evil knevil. thanks for watching. number one bsi block continues with cheryl casoney and cashin. >> bosses be wear. employees may get the green light to bash there arecompany on social media sights. the same law protects them and workers the workers and take on colleagues on twitter. some say it is about boosting big labor. are they right? i am cheryl casewn and welcome to cashin in . joining us this week marjorie christon and welcome to all of you. johnathon i will start with you. is this about protecting the workers or padding union numbers? >> it is shocking, cheryl. it is union-led government force that is tremendoly destructive to businesses. i mean, whose company is it anyway? the owners or the governments? of course, it is the owners and only the owner decides who works there. you have no right to a job let alone one that you bad-mo
and have a great day. >> on tuesday see, calling from omaha, neb.. >> i was just thinking about this. i don't want to take anyone's guns away, but i want people to realize that it started 50 or 60 years ago with politicizing and propagandizing from the nra. it goes back to money. makes me so mad they use their amendment to say look at our cause. when the president talked after that incident, he said the best resolution is to put guns in all schools. it was just furthering his cause to get money. it is for a well formed militias. at the time when this amendment was written, we had muskets. we did not have bullets that could shoot 100 bullets in the second and put it in perspective -- and not saying take away guns. is as relevantry to them as to why they have a gun, but sometimes, because of the politicization of it, we can't even have a discussion. i want people to understand everybody's view is coming from a place to help. not to take away guns. there is the extreme left in the extreme right, but the nra has taken away our chance to have a meaningful discussion in this country. >> thank you
to be that america is the only country in the world that has video games. >>> hello everyone. i'm don lemon. the stories you're talking about in just a moment. but first, let's get you up to speed on the day's headlines here. clinics and hospital emergency rooms across the country are packed with people sick with the flu, rolling up their sleeves for a flu shot. the cdc director says we won't know more weeks if the flu season has peaked. 47 states are reporting widespread flu activity right now. >>> the brother of ailing venezuelan president hugo chavez says he is recovering well from his latest search. chavez is being treated for cancer in cuba. he's been unable to return to cuba for a planned inauguration. chavez has not been seen in public for about a month. >>> an operation to free a french spy captured in somalia has failed. france's president said two soldiers died possibly along with the hostage. france has come to the aid of mali's fragile government in its fight against islamic militants. those fighters are linked to al qaeda. >>> the man known as the american taliban has won a leg
the president will have to do something on the fiscal front to deal with the deficit, and i don't think he can get around ed, i don't think he wants to get around at. it will be how he approaches it will make a difference. >> charles, there are rumors circulating that republicans in the house will let the sequester said in and put him right back in the white house to do wit to -- deal with it. a plan is jack lew's a signal from obama that he will pursue the course he pursued in the first term, to spend as much as he needs to establish the entitlement state and tax at a higher level to pay for it. jack lew is exactly the kind of liberal historically who has been his warrior on the front in negotiating on this. there is no indication that lew would go in any other direction, and it is clear to me that by this series of agreements obama has made, unlike added a first term more features people of independent stature, he has gone from a team of rivals to team of underlings. >> well, that is one nomination, but the nomination of former srepublican senator chuck hagel to head the department of defens
with what charles said. these people are inherently as a group corrupt. i don't think that's fair. if you want to say they're not doing their jobs well, not making the tough political decisions, that's different from correct. and dagen hit the nail on the head. we support them inhese things. we don't want them to cut these programs. we, the people. that's the political problem. >> although, adam, in the election process, we are-- they do make several promises to do the right thing. and when they go there, whether they are hepressu're pr us, they don't do the right thing and hence the corruption. >> maybe my definition of corrupt-- that doesn't describe law breaking, things punishable by going to prison so he we may be talking past each other on this. it's difficult to define, charles, what the right thing is. >> the right thing, the right thing? >> should they cut medicare? >> are you serious? we've got-- yes, cut it all. cut it all. i think ben stein, the courage, the political courage to do the right thing. we all know the right thing. >> the american people don't want these programs cu
written by anonymous christians somewhere, i don't know, between 90-100 and that jesus himself would have been born sometime around 0, that's a lot of room to begin looking to the bible for ideas to express what you think is religioussy important about jesus and that's why i would look at these -- but i think mary was home in nazareth when she had jesus, i don't think she was in bethlehem. >> well, let's go to the basics, first of all, the year. was it not four years before a.d. started? >> well, a.d. starts as a medieval convention. jesus, if he's born -- this is one of the chronological differences between the gospels. if harrod is alive as he has to be from matthew's birth narrative to work we know that harrod died in minus 4. if there is a tax which happens when corinius is the liggot of syria as luke says, we know that a tax that happened in plus 6. so you have to pick where you want, matthew and luke named different points. >> is there an abundance of evidence forthcoming from archeology and other sources that will settle all of these matters, do you think, upcoming? >> well, it's h
, that kind of protection can't come soon enough. >> now that we don't have a seawall down there or any type of protection down at the water, when i rebuild, what's going to stop the next storm? the real money should be spent on protecting the community from the ocean coming back up. there's nothing to stop the next storm from doing basically the same thing to the community, just flooding us, possibly just flooding us, possibly killing us. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >> how many gun murders were there in britain? >> how many great white sharks kill people every year, but they are scared to swim. >> patrick kennedy, on the radical rant. >> i was disturbed. >> disturbed as a human being this is what our civil discourse has come to. >> i go toe to toe with this gun advocate. >> you are deliberately lying and deliberately twisting it. i want to revisit the best and the worst of the interviews, tonight, i am in favor a ban on semi-automatic assault weapons and high capacity magazines, i want to require prifrt dealers to run background checks on all at gun shows. and i think these are re
will do at the confirmation hearing. i don't believe there's moral equivalency between the two sides which is the suggestion of that article. >> he believe there is moral equivalency? >> you will have to ask him what he believes. my judgment and knowledge of chuck chuck and my suggestions with chuck would suggest that he wants to see both sides come to the table and find a solution. he spores the peace process. but he is upper most, a very, very strong supporter of the state of israel. he has voted for billions and billions of dollars of aid to israel. i have no question when it comes to challenges that have anything to do with putting israel at risk, chuck hagel will be on israel's side. remember, he is working for a president. and he will follow the poll so i was that president. >> the renew deed bait about iraq is also occurring. the "new york times" writes about that today. in his memoir, he writes something very poignant about the iraq war. he writes, "it all comes down to the fact we were asked to vote on a res lation based on half-truths, untruths and winful thinking. i voted for th
and minds. you are the leader. >> don't settle. lived better. live free. john: no more than 2 million understand nice. >> crystal.nice. >> stick around for the after the show show. >> brenda: pay day, may day. millions of americans seeing their paychecks take a hit for the first time this week as the payroll tax hike kicks into full gear. and with 77% of workers in the cross-fire, virtuly no one is safe. >> i almost cried because they took taxes, a lot of taxes out of me. >> it's one of those things that nobody is happy about. >> that sucks. >> it's not good to see it go down. >> it makes a little bit of a difference, maybe with a little less spending, fun stuff. >> my paycheck was about $60 less this months, that goes to food and groceries, i am not super happy about that. >> less money in my pocket and less money i spend, less money in the economy. so are they right? does this new payroll tax hike mean less spending and a weaker economy? hi, everyone, i'm brenda buttner, this is bulls and bears, here they are, the bulls and bears this week, gary b smith, tobin smith, jonas max ferri
like nick camerada, that kind of protection can't come soon enough. >> now that we don't have a seawall down there or any type of protection down at the water, when i rebuild, what's going to stop the next storm? the real money should be spent on protecting the community from the ocean coming back up. there's nothing to stop the next storm from doing basically the same thing to the community, just flooding us, possibly killing us. >> i'm here to tell you, 1776 will commence again if you try to take our firearms. >> but get ready, the president appears ready to make some changes with or without congress' approval. how many gun murders were there in great britain? >> how many great white sharks kill people every year but they're scared to swim? >> plus, a man who knows all too well the tragic toll of gun violence. former congressman patrick kennedy. >> i was just disturbed. disturbed as a human being that this is what our civil discourse has come to. >> and i go toe-to-toe with this gun advocate. >> what you're doing is deliberately lying, deliberately twisting it. >> this is "piers morga
as a result of a whole lot of activities by marketers that we don't even see or know about. and relating to a transformation in advertising that almost anyone except people in the advertising industry doesn't know about. >> host: what does that mean? >> guest: in the last 20 years, advertising has changed drastically with the rise of cable and then the internet. originally, advertising was making an ad, a commercial and then putting on just a few very popular media; newspapers, radio, magazines. with the rise of cable, all of a sudden you had hundreds of channels, and then with the internet it's infinite. but more so you have tingal stuff, and it -- digital stuff, and it becomes interactive. part of of what we know about is that we can talk back to the advertiser, we can click on manager, there's a -- something, there's a whole lot of stuff going on under the hood where data are taken from us, are used, and we become creatures that are created by the advertisers to understand us and then change what we see on the web very often -- this is going to happen more and more as we move forward
. how would he advise this president on how to overcome the threat? >> first of all, i don't think that is a correct assessment. chuck hagel said nothing is off the table but one of the things he believes in is prospects for negotiation. we have been ready to negotiate under the right set of circumstances with iran for the last several years with our friends and allies so, force is the table but i'm glad we have people like the president and like chuck hagel who will be very careful when you start throwing around the terms -- >> he says it's not feasible. do you agree it is not feasible. >> what is the not feasible? >> military option? >>> military option is always feasible, you tell me what the option is. are we going to blow up tehran or go after facilities that might be well protected or hidden? and i think bob gates, the previous secretary of defense, who pointed out the difficulty of striking these places is a real one. so any military option is feasible in terms of dropping bombs but what is the result of that military attack? with respect to the revolutionary guard, he has r
? and a lot of people don't think about that, man. a lot of people don't ponder the outcome of what they doing. they just do it until they realize, damn, man, this consequence is too harsh, what i just did. the reward don't outpay the risk. and before you know it, you're paying with your life, man. i'm paying with my life. i've got 50 years, man? you know, that's a life. i'm 27. 50 plus 27. 77 years old, are you serious? come on, man. that's life. >>> we're going into nut country. let's play "hardball." good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this. paranoid america is climbing out of its bunker. the near possibility, the near possibility that the obama administration might stop the easy sale of the scariest guns to the scariest people has aroused the slippery slope crowd. these cousins of the grassy noel folks believe that any limit on the wide-open market for guns and ammo threatens their own hardware. any reasonable action by the american people to stop the carnage is to these paranoids the first unfaultering step towards mass confiscation of everything from
be opposed to them? >> i don't believe that anyone should hold the american people hostage for a ranssome that they couldn't get in the ballot box. and that's what we see being done with the whole issue of the debt ceiling. for things we did we borrowed money. in fact, republicans and democrats alike passed these budgets and now republicans are saying they don't want to pay for the thing that is they voted for in these previous budgets. that to me is not the way you run government once again and to allow someone to play political mischief, to put preconditions on a balanced deal by saying we're going to ask for a ransom devastating cuts to social security and medicare, in order to cover costs to things like the bush tax cuts, unpaid for wars in iraq and afghanistan don't make sense. so i agree with the president. the american people should not be held hostage with this game of using the debt ceiling as a way to try to extract what you couldn't get through the ballot box. and i would urge the president to move forward and continue to have the economy grow, let the government move forward.
is interesting about technology is that we do a pretty good job of catching up to the basics. we don't do a very good job of genius, all right. if you take a look at google news, many of you use google news, it does a pretty good job of assembling the obvious stuff. it doesn't have a lot of insight. the role of journalists in my view is the role of insight. it will be a long time. here is an example. we had a project inside of google to write things. i suggested, by the way, you could have it write a paper and then you can have it add 7% and then another 7%. it would produce infinitely long papers. it looked at the information and assembles it. it did a pretty good job of a bad author. if you read it and have a good author, you can see the difference. this is where we are. it may be that 50 years from now, the systems will be so powerful that they can replicate the kind of special insight that journalists and reporters and people who are practitioners have, but it will be a long time before that's the case. >> on that reassuring note, thank you. >> thank you very much. [applause]>> at that same
with two veterans, benjamin, who serve in the marines, and brian in the air force. i don't belong on a panel with people who actually lived through it, although my book is about war as well. last through, there are other veterans in my book are actually here. stan and dave roller are in the back there, and thank you for being here. means a lot to me that you're here. [applause] >> one of the things i'm asked is why did i write a book about this one combat outpost in afghanistan? it's not really my area of expertise. i'm a political reporter, the senior white house correspondent for abc news. the answer is i feel like i at any time pick combat outpost quieting to write about. i felt like come about outpost keeting picked me. on october 3, 2009, i was in the recovery room of the hospital with my dear wife, jennifer, and i was holding our day-old son jack, and everything was fine. she had a baby so that's why we were there. and out of the corner of my eye on the television, i heard a story that was just harrowing from this remote outpost, that i'd never heard of, at the bottom of thr
? >> i don't see how it can't, brenda. the person in tt little clip summed it up perfectly. it makes a little bit of a difference and a little bit of a difference times a few hundred million people makes a big difference. it's already been studied by economists, they predict 4 to 500,000 jobs lost, 1/2% lopped off the the gdp. if you look around the studio there, everyone that gets a paycheck, like they said in that little clip, sees less he money. that's less money they were going to spend on groceries, at the drug store, the gas station and that money gets sucked out of the economy, so do jobs. >> brenda: well, now, this does hit lower and middle class americans harder because there is a limit to the amount of income that is taxed. but toby, do you think the higher income americans can make up the spending? >> well, yes. and the fact is, whether this sounds fair or not fair, here are the facts that the top 20% earners in the united states, not the 50% who don't pay any taxes, by the way. but top 20% we look at and measure for discretionary spending because that's the margin, the sp
number that would be nice. who is the safety person? we don't want to send people out, just hey, go do this. we want to keep track of it. if they don't come back within a couple hours we have to send somebody to find them or at least checkup on them. if we don't know where they went and who they are, you have chaos. they might be hurt and they're going to stay hurt. we're going to roll on to disaster psychology. what does that mean? when people go through a disaster, their lives are wrecked. i saw this firsthand, i went down to help out with katrina thing in september. it's weird. because you are dealing with people that lost everything and it's kind of hard to imagine that if you haven't done it yourself. basically, you know, she's looking at her curtains here, she probably hand-stitched those things. maybe they have been hanging there the last 5 or 6 years. everything in the house is wrecked, photos, keepsakes, it's a tough thing. and people deal with this kind of stress in different ways. we as disaster workers, we see it all the time. but we have a word we use, professional. we try
. but the fact that he said that we were beautiful and gorgeous, i don't see why any woman wouldn't be flattered by that. >> so she was flattered. she was not offended, still espn put out a fire that wasn't even burning and issued a network apology saying musburger's comments, quote, went too far. nonsense. just tonight i said to a co-worker, you look great tonight. don't send me to h.r. she laughed and said, thank you. no apology from me. people like to be complimented. especially if you're a beauty queen. beauty, he said she was beautiful. i'm don lemon. thank you for watching. from the cnn world headquarters in atlanta, good night. >>> 1776 will commence again if you try to take our firearms. >> the infamous alex jones. how many gun murders were there in great britain? >> how many great white sharks kill people every year but they're scared to swim? >> plus, a man who knows all too well the tragic toll of gun violence. former congressman patrick kennedy. >> i was just disturbed. disturbed as a human being that this is what our civil discourse has come to. >> and i go toe-to-toe with this gun
would not have had a green job. if they installed regulatory, they don't have green jobs. if the install low flow toilet, they have green jobs. farmers, if they grow corn for ethanol, they have a green job. if they grow corn for ethanol and corn for people to eat, they have a green job. if they just grow corn for people to eat, even though they are farms, they don't have green jobs. salvation army workers, if they recycle used clothing, then they have green jobs, too. well, there are 4665 people who produce renewable energy and utility companies, according to the bureau of labor statistics. they just report which came out in april. they are clearly green but you have to ask, are they making energy more expensive or are they making it less expensive. well, it's clear that they're making energy more expensive. the average level has cost entering service in 2017 according to the department of energy is it there till by natural gas which cost $66 per megawatt hour, for wind, $96 per megawatt hour, for solar power, $153 per megawatt hour. well, five years ago in 07 when the energy loan guaran
interesting. there are 3 million jobs today in america that cannot be filled because we don't have the skills for them. mackenzie interviewed companies and 40% of them said they have jobs to offer, but they cannot find skilled workers. they predict by 2020 around the world there will be 85 million high and medium level jobs that will not have people with the right skills. the point is, what should business do and what is business doing? business should be creating apprenticeships. business opportunities for entry-level people, not as part of philanthropy, but because they know that in order to survive for the long term, they need to create opportunities. rolls-royce for instance. for 20 years that had the rolls- royce academy, where they pay people for their first two years to only be an apprentice. that are not going to school for two years and being paid. they go through all of the divisions of rolls-royce, and then they either make it or they don't, but right now, 40% of top management had gone through that apprenticeship program. rolls royce 20 years ago realized they needed to train peop
in a constitutional convention as a moderate in montgomery alabama in february of 1861. i don't think he ever did stand for election. one of the things americans think, one of the things they're told, the confederate constitution was a replica of the u.s. constitution, but it was not. a number of crucial changes, and one of them was they had a one-term executive, and i believe it was 5-year executive term. he avoided reelection. >> professor mccurry, did -- was there a lot of political infighting during the war? >> yes. there was. and there were no for more -- for all political parties. one of the things that is interesting is that it so quickly became on the ropes that a lot of things that were planned never really materialized. and there was political opposition, but it was theoretically everybody was a democrat. there was no republican party. no republican party ticket offered in the south. you could not vote for lincoln. but there were all lined with the southern wing of the democratic party. during the war opposition arose, and some were profoundly opposed to the davis administration, on ver
are current owners of weapons. we don't believe that this epidemic is affecting our whole country, just the people who already own guns are buying more. >> geraldo: i don't know if that is true. in december, there were more federal criminal background checks done than in any previous month. but let's even if it is people who own guns, i mean everyone flocking to the stores, does that give you pause, margo? >> well, of course, we are worried about the proliferation of guns in our country. i don't really understand the necessity for these military style weapons and i know that even the majority, 74% of nra members don't understand the need for these types of weapons. >> geraldo: now, you have a march planned on washington for what date? >> january 29. >> geraldo: january 29. >> ten days prior to that, larry, your group is holding its national gun appreciation day. what is the the idea? >> the idea is very much in the line with chick-fil-a appreciation day. we are asking people to go out and celebrate the second amendment by going to your gun store or local gun range or local gun show and
talked to people, don't just take pictures of empty buildings with nobody in the picture. >> that's one of the things that struck me about the book. it's not to treat the building. is to treat the. in some cases it's the people you happen to cross. it's not talking heads, not public officials, not price people. vicious people you met. one of my favorite stories in the book is the day you go down to the site of the original train from which now has a hotel on it that is sitting there empty and you met a bunch of different people down there, but one of them was this guy, tony. i wanted you to talk about how you met him hemline included him in the boat. >> at least asserted a telling moment. i guess i loved that kind of moment because of the serendipity of it. i'd been reading a lot of detroit history. it wasn't long after i got here. you know, as people here know, near the plaza is where cadillac, the french explorer, land owners a statue and so i've been reading about that and decided in this an unusually sunny day in the fall, so i decided to make my way down there and sit outside. it w
are very. were not going to talk about that. don't worry. i was forced to make and a couple of questions raised about "witness" and one might say more generally anti-communism are relevant today. the first place where subfor clearly gets development when we deal with the great communist power communist power of the day, china. chambers -- this is a passage i like. chambers wrote, what i had been felt for me like 30 rags. the rags wrecks itself for me where not a there communism but a new web in the mine, loomis shroud which has part of the spirit of man paralyzing the name of rationalism, the instinct of his soul. denying him the name of knowledge the reality of his soul and his birthright in that mystery on which new knowledge falters and shatters at every step. we now watch the soulless chinese communist party battle chinese christians, chinese buddhists, and believe that they can only offer a few more better factory jobs in port cities that will provide the answer to the chinese people's freedom. everything in that sense that chambers wrote about communism and its failures is quite ad
is necessary and imperative to sway the doubtful. if you don't dot numbers you won't succeed. the two men together succeeded. >> we're speaking with forking and the comprise of the union. thank you. .. >> host: we are here today to talk about your book, "that's not what they meant" reclaiming the founding fathers from america's right wing. how has america's right-wing claimed the founding fathers? >> guest: well i think the founding fathers are part of the wilderness in america and we all claim them for a lot of different political points. i think that in the current historical moment, the right-wing has done two things that i find a little bit disturbing. one is they have collected fight the founding fathers and created a sort of collective single entity, a high mind founding father and they have attributed a whole lot of things that one or two people during the founding generation believed to this collective mind. then they have used it to try to say this is what our founders believed. certain opinions are illegitimate and cannot be entertained. and have used that founding -- and i thin
executive action if you're ever going to do it it, maybe now would be the time. >> alisyn: i don't think you need to. >> tucker: what you don't want if you're the president is to have a national debate on the subject because there's no evidence, never been any evidence, i mean data evidence, social science that shows at that guns control reduces crime. if you would get it through congress you would have adults talking about it in public and that's messy and unfortunate and difficult. >> what we want. >> tucker: it's easier to force through on executive order. >> alisyn: we shall see if that's what their plan is and we'll talk more about what the center for american progress proposed. you know the story of the journal news, at that published the names and addresses legal gun owners our own judge jeanine pirro was on that list, last night on her show, she just-- well, first what she did was send one of other producers to the journal news to try to get answers for why they did this. let's see what happened when the producer showed up. >> why won't you talk to us? can you tell me why you guys re
- in for treasury secretary or does president obama have a fight on his hand? >> i don't know if you would call him a shoe-in. he is going to be touched up a bit by the republicans but he is going to be confirmed. does obama have a fight object his hands? you bet, but the fight is going to be over chuck hagel for secretary of defense. that is going to be a proxy battle between what you might call the know 0-conservatives, the bush ii folks, mccain, lieberman, lindsey graham, and the others and what hagel stands for, john, is non- interventionist foreign policy. we don't go to war unless vital interests are at stake. we put our own country first. i think this is going to be the battle royal in the coming months. >> eleanor. >> nobody is a shoe-in with the republican party that fails to defeat president obama for reelection but still seems determined to make him a failed president but jacob lew is as close to a shoe-in as there can be. the only complaint you hear is that he hasn't spent enough time on wall street, and for a lot of democrats that's actually a positive attribute. so he will be confirme
, especially for kids are a lot of times, they don't know how to scale down for a child-size body and the machines may not calibrate or have clear directions on how to make that happen so in our own lives, we can ask our health care provides, are there safer alternative, mri or ultrasounds for doing this test, and then if you have kids and they need a test, ensure and ask questions about the safest dose and if they have machines that can calibrate to kids, and then we have to see these changes with the laws so if fda has proposals out for medical imaging around kids so you know how to downsize a radiation dose for kids who is smaller, their physical size is narrower, and also to make machines more accountable and more clear in how they work. >> [inaudible]. >> it's very low doses but that's an excellent question and i thought somebody would probably ask that. so, the united states preventative services task force in 2009 came out with a proposal to revise guidelines saying that perhaps women aged 40 to 50, there's no cost benefit really for that age group in terms of having mammog
." that was the sherman like statement you issued. >> that's, well, i'm not quite up to sherman's standards and i don't think i'm quite ready to lay waste to georgia either. but a good, good man i admire actually. >> but t grassots campaign in your behalf, unofficial, was serious. i mean, over 235,000 people signed on. you broke their hearts. any regrets? >> no, because i probably have more influence than i, doing what i do now than i would if i were inside trying to, you know, do the court power games that come with any white house, even the best, which i don't think i'd be any good at. so no, this is fine. and what the president needs right now is he needs a hardnosed negotiator. and rumor has it that's what he's got, so. >> in jack lew? >> that's right. the present can't pass major new legislation. he can't formulate major new programs right now. what he has to do now is bargain down or ride over these crazy people in the republican party. and we what we need now is not deep thinking from the treasury secretary. if the president wants deep thinkers, he can call joe stiglitz, he can call other peop
write articles about the fiscal cliff debate and the ins and outs and what's being cut and those don't get as many clicks as who is being mean to the president or who the president is being tough talking to. right? so, a lot of americans follow media coverage about the shenanigans, the inner workings and the purse nals and don't want to hear the nit aty-gritty about the details. does it mean we don't have a responsibility to discuss those details? absolutely we do. i'm being forth right on what goes on. it's not surprising that people are following the fight more than the details of what could happen with the legislation. >> that is the core issue. what our responsibility is to not only cover this issue, but maybe push it. after every other mass shooting. we lived through a lot of them of them in the past couple of decades. the gun issue flares up. this time seems to be very different. why? >> you had a very emotional issue. 20 school children, if that doesn't get anybody's attention, nothing will. we're not pushing an agenda, we're covering the news. the president has raised this is
hello earn. >>> i'm don lemon, going to get you up to speed on the headline uts. italy's council general has survived an assassination attempt. no one was injured but it was the latest attack targeting missions in the city. france's military is caring out operations in who hot spots in african. more than 100 people have been killed in northern mally. france has come to the aide of mali. two french soldiers were killed in the attempt to free a french intelligence agent who may have died in the raid. government air forces are back in action and pounding the out skirts of damascus. >> the rebels are cl s are cla victory. they seized weapons and ammunition after the battle. activists say that at least 108 people were killed today in the civil war. a relative said that aaron swartz committed suicide at the age of 26 . he had legal trouble related to his activism and had blogged about his battle against depression. at a time when the gun control debate is everywhere and showing no signs of fading. the debate will get more fuel tuesday when the obama administration releases the plan to
don't know just yet. it is familiart that there would be a changing of the guards between a first and second term. as it goes in churmz of steven chuit remains to be seen. some names would be byron dorgen, the democrat from north dakota. governor of the state of washington as well as jennifer gran. we know of one likely departure that we should hear about. that is a name not familiar to a lot of americans. she served as a deputy chief of staff to the president. it is likely that she is going to leave. there has been a lot of conversation about the number of women that have surrounded the president in this new cabinet. the last four positions we have seen were all men. nancy's name was not thrown around yet and some people are saying more women's names should have been considered. >> peter alexander, thank you so much and we will be stopping back with you to talk about immigration. >>> with chuck hagel's nomination looking like a tough one powell had this to say on "meet the press" this morning. >> i think he will do a great job as secretary of defense. i think all of these issues
we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day afr day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] e pill eachmorning. 24 hours. zero heartbur trust duracell to power their donated toys? duralock power preserve. it locks in power for up to 10 years in storage guaranteed. duracell with duralock. trusted everywhere. >>> can you believe he was almost president. he is totally devoid of any moral outlook at all. it's horrible. now he is rehe vealed as someone who goes for the short money and someone who goes for the couple p change. >> and worse, somebody who it in bed with baby killers. >> is al gore really in bed with baby killers? welcome to the program, everybody. i'm geraldo rivera. in 2013 has so far been a good year and a bad year for the former vice president. first of all, he became a very rich man after selling his hard left cable channel current tv to al-jazeera a for $500 million. that is where o'reilly's baby killer criticism come
don't want them here, alluding to those who might benefit from the d.r.e.a.m. act. so republicans have their own pr campaign to conduct with latinos on immigration reform, but how is the president going to combat republicans who want to see a more piece meal approach as we move forward here? >> reporter: i think we've seen the way the president has handled other recent challenges from his republican opposition when you consider just the fiscal cliff hanger as it were with campaign stops in various parts of the country. consider a statistic that i think a lot of americans are going to refocus on is the immigration conversation returns to the fore. it's the fact that the president won 70% of the hispanic vote in this past election. a dramatic -- dramatic element in his success and obviously the republican party recognizes it's harsh language, some rhetoric used by mitt romney and other republicans around the country didn't help its chance of gaining support within that community. john boehner, the speaker of the house, has said that they need to have a more practical, a more pragmatic ap
, but you realize thatyou don't -- this is your time to pin the regime and colonel gadhafi to the wall. if you don't expresses what you want from this and have a clear end goal, things will not work out well. and we're willing to say that even if we are poised to make a lot of money out of this. this wasn't the view of everyone, of course, but these kinds of hushed sort of warnings resonated very strongly with me. and i think are in some ways explained or increasingly explained by some of the news that we're hearing in retrospect about what actually went on during some period of the gadhafi regime. so, you know, the book, i think there were basically four takeaways, four main points that i try to make, and one of them is very, sort of has been brought into profile by the presidential debate and the whole issue of what happened in benghazi on september 11th which is the, what i call the myth of libya's irrelevance to u.s. policy. and i think over the course of, if you go back to the foundations of the libyan state in 1951, you know, u.s. relations with libya have been, you know, u.s. ha
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